Looking carefully.

When I have not much to do, which is more often than it should be, I love looking through old photos and reliving experiences. Today’s picture could have been taken in any of the cities in which we lived in Ethiopia. I’ve tried to mark some things which reflect the economy of the land, and I comment on them. Remember that the population is still about 85% rural which tends to be poorer than the cities.

  1. You can see the tall unmarked pole, which is either a telephone (unlikely) or an electricity one. But you cannot see any connections to any of the dwellings. It is passing through to a richer area, and there are some very rich areas!
  2. The pink arrow points to a water tank. There are no gutters visible. There is a water distribution throughout the city but it is frequently not available, so when you can, you fill up a reservoir against those times.
  3. The red hexagons mark the different standards of roofing, some of which are virtually non existent. They have periods of very heavy rains.
  4. The purple arrow marks an example of child labour. Sheets of iron are being put onto the roof.He is obviously a teenager but often you see little kids carrying far too heavy loads and with great responsibility – often carrying babies on their backs or with loads of wood on their backs.
  5. The red arrow shows the outlet above the communal toilet. People often shower over the toilet or under a spray in the open. From personal experience you try to not need ‘to go’ when visiting these places!
  6. The blue arrow marks a group of ladies in community. You can see their beautiful white teeth, as grinning they look up to where I am taking a photo.
  7. The white arrow indicates their love of cleanliness in the midst of difficult circumstances.Their white clothes are sparkling!

Dominic Cartier.

2 thoughts on “Looking carefully.

  1. Great points of interest. (I would have liked it if the arrows were a bit thicker.) 46 years ago I was in Malaysia and I was amazed when I saw Malaysian Office girls stepping over a huge drain on a thin plank all of them dressed immaculately. They had come from their kampong with its one tap in the middle for about twenty huts. They were clean and bright and happy. And there were European backpackers wandering around in what looked like Salvation Army Op Shop discards.

    Like

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